Poverty is no accident

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onepence
Posts: 473
Joined: Sat Feb 04, 2006 2:44 pm
Location: Longwood, FL, USA

Poverty is no accident

Postby onepence » Sat Feb 18, 2006 5:10 am

fond it interesting that the WCC says
Poverty is no accident and churches must challenge the economic institutions
man i wish this forum had more people interested in discussioning monetary developments.

oneness
dh

.............

http://www.wfn.org/2006/02/msg00245.html

Feb. 17, 2006

Christian economists say poverty
'is the fruit of deliberate policy'

Churches must challenge economic institutions, WCC is told

by Jerry L. Van Marter
Ecumenical News International

PORTO ALEGRE, Brazil - Poverty is no accident, but is the product of unjust
economic structures that churches must struggle to reform, a Ugandan
economist told a gathering of world church leaders here yesterday (Feb. 16).

"Poverty doesn't just 'exist' - it is manufactured by those who
control the markets," said Yashpal Tandon, executive director of the South
Center in Geneva, Switzerland, a think-tank that deals with issues of trade
and economic development in Africa. He made his remarks during a news
conference during the ninth Assembly of the World Council of Churches (WCC).

"Poverty is not a natural phenomenon, but is the fruit of deliberate
policy, and churches must challenge the economic institutions that create and
perpetuate the policies," the Ugandan economist said, speaking in the city
where the first World Social Forum was held.

The WCC, which has ....

CJ

Postby CJ » Sat Feb 18, 2006 11:55 am

i find this very interesting. I have never thought about this before, but now that I do it makes perfect sense. we have been brought up with the idea that poverty is the result of being born into it, or laziness, or bad morals. it's a relief to see that someone is actually looking at this issue in this way and taking steps to start to tackle this issue.

onepence
Posts: 473
Joined: Sat Feb 04, 2006 2:44 pm
Location: Longwood, FL, USA

Postby onepence » Sat Feb 18, 2006 9:43 pm

CJ wrote:i find this very interesting. I have never thought about this before, but now that I do it makes perfect sense. we have been brought up with the idea that poverty is the result of being born into it, or laziness, or bad morals. it's a relief to see that someone is actually looking at this issue in this way and taking steps to start to tackle this issue.


thank you for the response ...

if you get a chance you may wish to visit website
http://goldismoney.info
and the forum section is filled with all sorts of discussion ... mostly centered around the pure materialistic veiw of life ... but none the less some good discussion about gold and silver as money

also the following document is fascinating in dealing with learning economic thought ...

The Prosperity of Humankind

http://statements.bahai.org/95-0303.htm

...

The problem of poverty is a case in point. Proposals aimed at addressing it are predicated on the conviction that material resources exist, or can be created by scientific and technological endeavor, which will alleviate and eventually entirely eradicate this age-old condition as a feature of human life. A major reason why such relief is not achieved is that the necessary scientific and technological advances respond to a set of priorities only tangentially related to the real interests of the generality of humankind. A radical reordering of these priorities will be required if the burden of poverty is finally to be lifted from the world. Such an achievement demands a determined quest for appropriate values, a quest that will test profoundly both the spiritual and scientific resources of humankind. Religion will be severely hampered in contributing to this joint undertaking so long as it is held prisoner by sectarian doctrines which cannot distinguish between contentment and mere passivity and which teach that poverty is an inherent feature of earthly life, escape from which lies only in the world beyond. To participate effectively in the struggle to bring material well-being to humanity, the religious spirit must find -- in the Source of inspiration from which it flows -- new spiritual concepts and principles relevant to an age that seeks to establish unity and justice in human affairs.


Unemployment raises similar issues. In most of contemporary thinking, the concept of work has been largely reduced to that of gainful employment aimed at acquiring the means for the consumption of available goods. The system is circular: acquisition and consumption resulting in the maintenance and expansion of the production of goods and, in consequence, in supporting paid employment. Taken individually, all of these activities are essential to the well-being of society. The inadequacy of the overall conception, however, can be read in both the apathy that social commentators discern among large numbers of the employed in every land and the demoralization of the growing armies of the unemployed.


Not surprisingly, therefore, there is increasing recognition that the world is in urgent need of a new "work ethic." Here again, nothing less than insights generated by the creative interaction of the scientific and religious systems of knowledge can produce so fundamental a reorientation of habits and attitudes. Unlike animals, ...

CJ

Postby CJ » Mon Feb 20, 2006 10:56 pm

'Poverty doesn't just 'exist' - it is manufactured by those who
control the markets," said Yashpal Tandon'

something I find interesting is that 'those who control the markets' are shareholders, in a lot of cases. I don't know a lot about these things, but apparently shareholders have the right to sue companies if they feel that these companies are not doing enough to maximize their profit. Henry Ford raised the wages of his workers to try to combat poverty but was sued successfully by his shareholders, who claimed he was not maximizing their share profits.

onepence
Posts: 473
Joined: Sat Feb 04, 2006 2:44 pm
Location: Longwood, FL, USA

'those who control the markets'

Postby onepence » Tue Feb 21, 2006 8:31 am

Dear CJ,

It gladdens this souls spirit to know that thou art still interested in the subject 'Poverty doesn't just 'exist' and to properly notice that "that 'those who control the markets' are shareholders" shows great clearity and insight upon your part.

In one sense we are all shareholders of all corporations for we all share in distributing money, which is the most common "manufactured" item that controls the markets.

I too have found shareholder rights and responseablities fascinating and also have noticed how shareholders not only can influence any given corporation, but also entire nations {as in the case of certain usa shareholders pressuring corporations to end business ties with South Africa until issues of apartied where outlawed}, and therefore shareholders rights and responseablities clearly exert great pressure upon the worlds markets.

There is also issues of safeguarding the rights of shareholders. In contemporary America the sec is designed to protect shareholders, unfortunatelly it appears that this protection is lacking individuals who understand even the most basic of economic thinking. A case in point is naked short selling which not only does the sec condone but encourages, and its worst form of abuse is the current naked short selling of our stockpiles of silver.

If you wish to learn more about naked short selling, the sec, and or the ever dwindling USA stockpile of silver there are plenty of search engines that could help and I would encourage you in this endeavour.

You also may find searching the term "storehouse" to be of interest.

keep the faith

oneness
dh

onepence
Posts: 473
Joined: Sat Feb 04, 2006 2:44 pm
Location: Longwood, FL, USA

on a related note

Postby onepence » Tue Feb 21, 2006 9:38 am

on a related note

...

http://www.lewrockwell.com/north/north149.html

....

The case for a gold coin standard is the case for individual economic sovereignty. It is a case for a monetary standard that arises without government interference for or against gold as money. This is the case for voluntary contracts.

The modern economy is not a voluntaristic system. The laws reflect the political power of special-interest voting blocs. Commercial banks are among the most powerful of these special interests. The modern monetary system is therefore a rigged system. It always has been, but from the end of the Napoleonic wars in 1815 until the outbreak of World War I in 1914, the international monetary system was the least rigged system since the days of the gold coin standard in the Byzantine Empire, which enjoyed eight centuries of stable money.

The public in the West today is completely unfamiliar with gold as money. Everyone uses paper money or bank credit money: checks and credit cards. Contracts are written in terms of bank credit money. Everyone’s economic plans are based on men’s faith in the long-term sovereignty of governments over money, which means bank credit money. The mark of this faith is the capital markets’ responses to decisions of the Federal Reserve System, which is seen as an appendage of Alan Greenspan. He has the power to move markets up or down merely by controlling the degree of clarity in his public pronouncements.

If we are going to defend intellectually the legitimacy of free market economics and free market institutions, then we must adopt the principle of consumer sovereignty. The primary justification of the free market is that it extends the greatest authority to the individual over his own affairs. It makes individuals responsible for the allocation of whatever they own. It is a system based on the judicial and moral principle of individual legal responsibility.

So, the intellectual defenders of the pure gold coin standard are caught in a bind. They believe that government manipulation of the monetary system is inefficient. This interference with consumer sovereignty over money through contract law must produce a misallocation of money, meaning capital. The present system will produce booms and bust ...

onepence
Posts: 473
Joined: Sat Feb 04, 2006 2:44 pm
Location: Longwood, FL, USA

No Masking the Poverty

Postby onepence » Fri Mar 03, 2006 2:56 pm

No Masking the Poverty

http://www.trueblueliberal.com/2006/03/ ... e-poverty/

Friday, March 3rd, 2006 by RLR

From The LA Times

By David K. Shipler

The forced revelry of Mardi Gras is over. The final dissonant notes of marching bands have died away; the last glittering beads have been thrown against the sorrow of a wounded city. Watched from a distance, New Orleans is America, struggling under a sparkling facade.

The city’s tragedy offered us a chance to do some good for ourselves, but we’re missing it. We now suffer from an extremely short attention span. Last September, President Bush gave a stirring speech in New Orleans about what he called the “deep, persistent poverty” displayed on television after Hurricane Katrina. “That poverty,” he declared, “has roots in a history of racial discrimination, which cut off generations from the opportunity of America. We have a duty to confront this poverty with bold action.”

His bold action has been to submit a federal budget that will actually weaken important antipoverty programs.

This is odd. This nation used to be more easily outraged when wrongs were done to its own people. When black children were jeered and threatened as they tried to enter white schools in the South, when civil rights demonstrators were assaulted with police clubs and fire hoses, the images mobilized the conscience of the country.


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